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UK-wide strikes in colleges and universities over pensions, pay and jobs on 24 March

15 March 2011 | last updated: 4 April 2019

Members of UCU at colleges and universities across the UK will be on strike on Thursday 24 March in a row over changes to pension schemes, jobs losses and pay cuts.

The first national strike in higher education for five years and the first in further education since 2008 will deliver the first joint action across the post-16 education sector by the union.
 
Strike action will kick off in Scottish universities on Thursday (17 March) as members of the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) take action in defence of their pensions. There will then be days of strike action in Wales on Friday 18 March, in Northern Ireland on Monday 21 March and England on Tuesday 22 March, ahead of the UK-wide action over pensions, jobs and pay on Thursday 24 March; two days before the TUC's central London 'March for the alternative'.
 
UCU members of the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) are striking against proposals to reduce pension benefits and increase costs, even though the scheme is in robust health. More information on the dispute can be found at: USS changes - key questions
 
UCU members of the TPS scheme voted for strike action against proposals to raise contributions from scheme members and increase the pension age. More information on that dispute can be found at: TPS latest
 
UCU members in both further and higher education voted for strike action to defend their pay and members in higher education to call for job security.

UCU general secretary, Sally Hunt, said: 'Staff at colleges and universities across the UK will be out on strike on Thursday 24 March in an unprecedented level of action across the further and higher education sectors. The attacks on staff's pensions, pay and job security have created real anger throughout the sector and instead of burying their heads in the sand the employers need to respond urgently to UCU's attempts to negotiate.'

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